Questions and Answers

Jerusalem Temple

jerusalem temple painting

How was Jerusalem Temple destroyed?
During the First Temple period (1200-586 BC), the First Temple was built in 1000 BC by King Solomon after King David conquered Jerusalem and made it his capital. The Temple was destroyed in 586 BC by Nebuchadnezzar, the King of Babylon, when he conquered Jerusalem.
How many times Jerusalem Temple destroyed?
Similarly, the state of Israel has most of its government institutions in the city while Palestinians aspire to be a state and hope to establish their capital in the city of Jerusalem. Throughout its history, the city has been destroyed at least two times, attacked 52 times, besieged 23 times, and recaptured 44 times.
How big was Jerusalem Temple?
The Temple Mount was originally intended to be 1600 feet wide by 900 feet broad by 9 stories high, with walls up to 16 feet thick, but had never been finished. To complete it, a trench was dug around the mountain, and huge stone "bricks" were laid.
How many gates in Jerusalem Temple?
The Temple Mount, located in Jerusalem, can be accessed through twelve gates, and contains a further six sealed gates.
How was the Temple destroyed?
Around 20 BCE, the building was renovated and expanded by Herod the Great, and became known as Herod's Temple. It was destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE during the Siege of Jerusalem.  The emperor Julian allowed to have the Temple rebuilt but the Galilee earthquake of 363 ended all attempts ever since.
What did Jerusalem Temple look like?
The Temple in Jerusalem was any of a series of structures which were located on the Temple. All that which is surrounded by this partition, which, as noted, is like the court of the Tabernacle, is called 'Courtyard'. However, in Herzl's view, the Temple did not need to be built on the precise site where the old Temple stood
What was Jerusalem's Temple?
The Temple in Jerusalem was any of a series of structures which were located on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem, the current site of the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa Mosque. These successive temples stood at this location and functioned as a site of ancient Israelite and later Jewish worship.
What does the Temple look like in Jerusalem?
The Temple in Jerusalem was any of a series of structures which were located on the Temple. While Greek and Hebrew texts make this distinction, English texts do not always do so. Surrounding the Sanctuary, distant from it, similar to the screen-like hangings of the court that were in the wilderness.
When Jerusalem Temple was destroyed?
The rebellion against Rome that began in 66 CE soon focused on the Temple and effectively ended with the Temple's destruction on the 9th/10th of Av, 70 CE
When was Jerusalem Temple built?
The First Temple was constructed during the reign of David's son, Solomon, and completed in 957 BC. Other sanctuaries retained their religious functions, however, until Josiah (reigned c. 640–609 BC) abolished them and established the Temple of Jerusalem as the only place of sacrifice in the Kingdom of Judah.
When was the second Jerusalem Temple destroyed?
In 37 BC, King Herod enlarged the Temple Mount and rebuilt the temple with the consent of the public. During the Roman period, in AD 70, the Second Temple was destroyed, along with Jerusalem, by Titus' army.
When was the first Jerusalem Temple destroyed?
According to contemporary accounts, the Babylonian Army destroyed the First Temple in 586 B.C. The ark of the covenant disappeared, possibly hidden from the conquerors.
When was the first Jerusalem Temple built?
The First Temple was constructed during the reign of David's son, Solomon, and completed in 957 BC. Other sanctuaries retained their religious functions, however, until Josiah (reigned c. 640–609 bce) abolished them and established the Temple of Jerusalem as the only place of sacrifice in the Kingdom of Judah.
When was the last time the Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed?
The rebellion against Rome that began in 66 ce soon focused on the Temple and effectively ended with the Temple's destruction on the 9th/10th of Av, 70
When the Temple was destroyed?
The rebellion against Rome that began in 66 CE soon focused on the Temple and effectively ended with the Temple's destruction on the 9th/10th of Av, 70 CE.
How many times was the Jerusalem Temple destroyed?
Similarly, the state of Israel has most of its government institutions in the city while Palestinians aspire to be a state and hope to establish their capital in the city of Jerusalem. Throughout its history, the city has been destroyed at least two times, attacked 52 times, besieged 23 times, and recaptured 44 times.
Where is Jerusalem Temple located?
The Temple in Jerusalem was any of a series of structures which were located on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem, the current site of the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa Mosque. These successive temples stood at this location and functioned as a site of ancient Israelite and later Jewish worship.
Where is the Temple in Jerusalem?
The Temple in Jerusalem was any of a series of structures which were located on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem, the current site of the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa Mosque. These successive temples stood at this location and functioned as a site of ancient Israelite and later Jewish worship.
Who built Jerusalem Temple?
King Solomon, according to the Bible, built the First Temple of the Jews on this mountaintop circa 1000 B.C., only to have it torn down 400 years later by troops commanded by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar, who sent many Jews into exile.
Who destroyed Jerusalem Temple?
The Temple suffered at the hands of Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylonia, who removed the Temple treasures in 604 B.C. and 597 B.C. and totally destroyed the building in 587/586.
Who destroyed the Jerusalem Temple in ad 70?
Siege of Jerusalem, (70 CE), Roman military blockade of Jerusalem during the First Jewish Revolt. The fall of the city marked the effective conclusion of a four-year campaign against the Jewish insurgency in Judaea. The Romans destroyed much of the city, including the Second Temple.
Who built the second Jerusalem Temple?
Of major importance was the rebuilding of the Second Temple begun by Herod the Great, king (37 B.C.–4 CE) of Judaea. Construction began in 20 B.C. and lasted for 46 years. The area of the Temple Mount was doubled and surrounded by a retaining wall with gates.
Who built the first Jerusalem Temple?
As the site for a future temple, David chose Mount Moriah, or the Temple Mount, where it was believed Abraham had built the altar on which to sacrifice his son Isaac. The First Temple was constructed during the reign of David's son, Solomon, and completed in 957 B.C.
Who destroyed the first Jerusalem Temple?
The Temple suffered at the hands of Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylonia, who removed the Temple treasures in 604 B.C. and 597 B.C. and totally destroyed the building in 587/586.
Who built the Temple in Jerusalem and Why was it important?
During the First Temple period (1200-586 BC), the First Temple was built in 1000 BC by King Solomon after King David conquered Jerusalem and made it his capital. The Temple was destroyed in 586 BC by Nebuchadnezzar, the King of Babylon, when he conquered Jerusalem.
Who will build the Temple in Jerusalem?
The Third Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש השלישי‎, Beit haMikdash haShlishi, literally: The House, the Holy, the Third) would be the third Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, after Solomon's Temple and the rebuilt Second Temple.
Although it remains unbuilt, the notion of and desire for a Third Temple is sacred in Judaism, particularly Orthodox Judaism, and anticipated as a place of worship. The prophets in the Hebrew Bible called for its construction to be fulfilled prior to, or in tandem with, the Messianic Age. The rebuilding of the Third Temple also plays a major role in some interpretations of Christian eschatology.
Why Jerusalem Temple was destroyed?
Much as the Babylonians destroyed the First Temple, the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and Jerusalem in c. 70 CE as retaliation for an ongoing Jewish revolt. The Second Temple lasted for a total of 585 years (516 BCE to c. 70 CE).
Why romans destroyed Jerusalem Temple?
Much as the Babylonians destroyed the First Temple, the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and Jerusalem in c. 70 CE as retaliation for an ongoing Jewish revolt.
Why is the Jerusalem Temple important?
As the Temple became the center of worship with sacrifice playing an important, even crucial, role within ancient Judaism, laws and obligations were established in order to accommodate sacrificial requirements imposed on the Judean community, both within ancient Palestine and in the Diaspora.
Why isn't the Jerusalem Temple rebuilt?
The failure to rebuild the Temple has been ascribed to the Galilee earthquake of 363 CE, and to the Jews' ambivalence about the project. Sabotage is a possibility, as is an accidental fire. Divine intervention was the common view among Christian historians of the time.
Why the Temple was destroyed?
Much as the Babylonians destroyed the First Temple, the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and Jerusalem in c. 70 CE as retaliation for an ongoing Jewish revolt. The Second Temple lasted for a total of 585 years (516 BCE to c. 70 CE).

Kever Rachel - Tomb of Rachel

Kever rachel painting

What is Tomb of Rachel?
The tomb, located at the northern entrance of Bethlehem, is built in the style of a traditional maqam. The burial place of the matriarch Rachel as mentioned in the Jewish Tanakh, the Christian Old Testament and in Muslim literature is contested between this site and several others to the north.
Where is Rachel's tomb located?
Rachel’s Tomb is located in the city of Bethlehem, just south of Jerusalem. For centuries, it lay on a deserted roadside, and Rachel’s descendants would come here to pour out their hearts to her—the mother who dwells in a lonely wayside grave in order to be there for her suffering children. Rachel is a continuous source of comfort to her children—praying for her children and eliciting the divine promise of her children’s return to their Promised Land.
How to get to Rachel's tomb?
Visiting the tomb is difficult. Although the gate is only a few meters from the entrance to Checkpoint 300, it is not possible to go through on foot. You will either need your own car or an Israeli taxi. Alternatively Egged bus 163 from Jerusalem's Central Bus Station goes all the way to the tomb.

Cave of the Patriarchs - Maarat Hamachpela

Jerusalem and Jewish Paintings

Where is cave of the patriarchs?
The Cave of the Patriarchs or Tomb of the Patriarchs, known to Jews as the Cave of Machpelah (Hebrew: מְעָרַת הַמַּכְפֵּלָה, About this sound Me'arat HaMakhpela, trans. "cave of the double tombs" or "cave of the double caves") and to Muslims as the Sanctuary of Abraham (Arabic: الحرم الإبراهيمي‎, About this sound al-Haram al-Ibrahimi), is a series of caves located in the heart of the Old City of Hebron in the southern West Bank. According to the Abrahamic religions, the cave and adjoining field were purchased by Abraham as a burial plot.
Are there bodies in the cave of the patriarchs?
The cave is filled with barrels containing bones of people, which are taken there as to a sacred place. At the end of the field of the Machpelah stands Abraham's house with a spring in front of it.
Where is Cave of the patriarchs located?
The Cave of Machpelah is the world's most ancient Jewish site and the second holiest place for the Jewish people, after Temple Mount in Jerusalem. The cave and the adjoining field were purchased—at full market price—by Abraham some 3700 years ago. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, and Leah are all later buried in the same Cave of Machpelah. These are considered the patriarchs and matriarchs of the Jewish people. The only one who is missing is Rachel, who was buried near Bethlehem where she died in childbirth.
Where is the tomb of the patriarchs?
The cave of Machpelah, in the West Bank city of Hebron, is the burial place of the Matriarchs and Patriarchs: Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, and Leah. According to Jewish mystical tradition, it's also the entrance to the Garden of Eden where Adam and Eve are buried.
Can you visit the cave of the patriarchs?
You are invited to visit the Cave of the Patriarchs, with various Jewish Israel tours as part of the Gush Etzion and Hebron tour.
Where is the cave of the patriarchs?
One of the most famous pieces of real estate on earth is the Cave of Machpelah (also known as the “Cave of the Patriarchs”) in the southern Israeli city of Hebron.
Machpelah means “doubled” in Hebrew. One reason given is that four prestigious couples are buried there: Adam and Eve, Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebecca, and Jacob and Leah. (Our matriarch Rachel was buried elsewhere.)
What is the cave of the patriarchs?
The Cave of the Patriarchs or Tomb of the Patriarchs, known to Jews as the Cave of Machpelah (Hebrew: מְעָרַת הַמַּכְפֵּלָה, About this sound Me'arat HaMakhpela, trans. "cave of the double tombs" or "cave of the double caves") and to Muslims as the Sanctuary of Abraham (Arabic: الحرم الإبراهيمي‎, About this sound al-Haram al-Ibrahimi), is a series of caves located in the heart of the Old City of Hebron in the southern West Bank. According to the Abrahamic religions, the cave and adjoining field were purchased by Abraham as a burial plot.
Where is the tomb of the patriarchs?
The Tombs of the Patriarchs in the West Bank city of Hebron is the burial place of three biblical couples — Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, and Jacob and Leah.
The second holiest site in Judaism (after the Western Wall in Jerusalem), it is also sacred to the other two Abrahamic faiths, Christianity and Islam.
What is inside of the cave of the patriarchs?
The yearning to enter and pray in the Caves of Machpelah has existed within the Jewish People for centuries. Scores of Jews braved many trials and tribulations in order to reach Hebron. However only a very few were privileged to enter the building covering of the Caves themselves. As is well known, the Arabs prevented Jews from entering this ancient structure, built during the Second Temple Period. Their feeble excuse for forbidding Jews to enter the building was that it is a Mosque. This was in spite of the fact that Islam was founded some 2,500 years after our Patriarch Abraham purchased the Caves and their surrounding field, and 700 years after the Jews built the huge monument covering the Tombs of the Patriarchs and Matriarchs.
Where is cave of the patriarchs?
The Cave of Machpelah is the world's most ancient Jewish site and the second holiest place for the Jewish people, after Temple Mount in Jerusalem. The cave and the adjoining field were purchased—at full market price—by Abraham some 3700 years ago. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, and Leah are all later buried in the same Cave of Machpelah. These are considered the patriarchs and matriarchs of the Jewish people. The only one who is missing is Rachel, who was buried near Bethlehem where she died in childbirth.
The double cave, a mystery of thousands of years, was uncovered several years ago beneath the massive building, revealing artifacts from the Early Israelite Period (some 30 centuries ago). The structure was built during the Second Temple Period (about two thousand years ago) by Herod, King of Judea, providing a place for gatherings and Jewish prayers at the graves of the Patriarchs.
Cave of the patriarchs location?
One of the most famous pieces of real estate on earth is the Cave of Machpelah (also known as the “Cave of the Patriarchs”) in the southern Israeli city of Hebron.
Where is the tomb of the patriarchs?
At Hebron Abraham purchased the Cave of Machpelah (Hebrew: Meʿarat ha-Makhpelah) as a burial place for his wife, Sarah, from Ephron the Hittite (Genesis 23); this became a family sepulcher. According to tradition, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, with their wives Sarah, Rebekah, and Leah, were buried in the cave.
Who is buried in the cave of the patriarchs?
The cave of Machpelah, in the West Bank city of Hebron, is the burial place of the Matriarchs and Patriarchs: Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, and Leah. According to Jewish mystical tradition, it's also the entrance to the Garden of Eden where Adam and Eve are buried.

 

Birkat Kohahim - Priestly Blessing

Birkat Kohanim Priestly Blessing by Alex Levin

What is the priestly blessing?
The Priestly Blessing (Birkat Kohahim in Hebrew), sometimes also called the threefold blessing, is an ancient benediction recited by the priests (kohanim) in the holy temple in Jerusalem. Today, it is recited in synagogues most commonly during the Musaf prayer, the additional holiday service recited after the Torah reading.
When is the priestly blessing said?
According to the Torah,[4] Aaron blessed the people,[5] and YHWH[6] promises that "They (the Priests) will place my name on the Children of Israel (the Priests will bless the people), and I will bless them" (the Priests, in turn, will receive G-D's Blessing.).[7] The Jewish Sages stressed that although the priests are the ones carrying out the blessing, it is not them or the ceremonial practice of raising their hands that results in the blessing, but rather it is God's desire that His blessing should be symbolized by the Kohanim's hands.
Even after the destruction of the second Hebrew Temple in Jerusalem, the practice has been continued in Jewish synagogues, and today in most Jewish communities, Kohanim bless the worshippers in the synagogue during special Jewish prayer services.
What does the priestly blessing mean?
You’ve probably heard the priestly blessing at least once or twice: “the Lord bless you and keep you”. Maybe you heard it without realizing what it was. Or, perhaps you have been dying to learn more about this passage, the Aaronic blessing, in Numbers. Either way, this article is for you.
What does the priestly blessing mean?
The act of blessing is deeply rooted in Israelite culture. It bears a wide range of meaning. On the one hand, Jacob’s stealing of Esau’s blessing and the latter’s inability to acquire another from his father, Isaac (Gen 27:30-38), provides a glimpse into the near magical power of blessing
Can the priestly blessing explained?
In ancient times, the priests recited the blessing twice each day while standing on a special platform known as a duchan. In some synagogues today, the recitation of the blessing is informally known as “duchaning.”
The blessing today is traditionally recited in synagogues by the kohanim, the descendants of Moses’ brother Aaron who served as priests in the temple. The common procedure is for the Levites, the descendants of the tribe of Levi who served as assistants in the temple, to wash the hands of the kohanim, who then remove their shoes and stand before the ark.
How to say the priestly blessing in Hebrew?
The Priestly Blessing or priestly benediction, (Hebrew: ברכת כהנים‎;. Birkat Kohanim), also known in rabbinic literature as raising of the hands (Hebrew nesiat kapayim)[1] or rising to the platform (Hebrew aliyah ledukhan)[2] or dukhanen (Yiddish from the Hebrew word dukhan – platform – because the blessing is given from a raised rostrum) or duchanning,[3] is a Hebrew prayer recited by Kohanim (the Hebrew Priests, descendants of Aaron).
What is the priestly blessing?
The Priestly Blessing is one of the most spiritually powerful rituals performed in the course of Jewish prayer services. At Beth Meyer, we only perform this rite on the Yamim Noraim (High Holy Days) and it is led jointly by the cantor and the Kohanim (descendants of the priestly class) in our congregation.
What does the priestly blessing mean?
PRIESTLY BLESSING (Heb. בִּרְכַּת כֹּהֲנִים), the formula in Numbers 6:24–26 ordained by God and transmitted to the priests by Moses for the blessing of Israel. Verse 27, "They shall invoke My name on behalf of the Israelites and I will bless them," makes explicit the intent of the ordained formula: to invoke the power of the Lord, who alone dispenses blessing. The threefold arrangement of the benediction may reflect an older incantation form; the three verses probably represent synonymous rather than climactic parallelism.
What is the priestly blessing?
he Priestly Blessing (Birkat Kohahim in Hebrew), sometimes also called the threefold blessing, is an ancient benediction recited by the priests (kohanim) in the holy temple in Jerusalem. Today, it is recited in synagogues most commonly during the Musaf prayer, the additional holiday service recited after the Torah reading.
What is the hebrew priestly blessing?
The text of the blessing is found in Numbers 6:23–27. According to the Torah, Aaron blessed the people, and YHWH promises that "They (the Priests) will place my name on the Children of Israel (the Priests will bless the people), and I will bless them" (the Priests, in turn, will receive G-D's Blessing.).
What is the priestly blessing in the bible?
The text of the blessing is found in Numbers 6:23–27. According to the Torah, Aaron blessed the people, and YHWH promises that "They (the Priests) will place my name on the Children of Israel (the Priests will bless the people), and I will bless them" (the Priests, in turn, will receive G-D's Blessing.).
When is the priestly blessing said?
It also may be said before a long journey, and some people will write it out and wear/keep it as an amulet. It is often used in the liturgy as the first section of Torah to be read in the morning after reciting the blessing before studying Torah.

Chuppah - Huppah

Chuppah

Can a chuppah be round?
If you're planning a Jewish ceremony, a standout chuppah (a canopy that a Jewish couple stands under at the altar) is a wonderful way to uphold the tradition and put a creative spin on your nuptials.
How to make a wedding chuppah?
The wedding chuppah is a symbol of the new home the new married couple will build together (as surrounded by their families). So before spending big bucks renting your chuppah from a florist, why not build your chuppah as well? Here are some simple directions on how to build your very own wedding chuppah with inexpensive and easy to find materials.
How long does chuppah last?
At an ultra-Orthodox wedding, men and women will also celebrate separately with a partition in between. How long is a Jewish wedding ceremony? A Jewish wedding ceremony typically ranges from 25-45 minutes depending on how much the couple seeks to embellish it with readings, rituals, and music.
How to make chuppah canopy?
Most synagogues have chuppahs for congregational use, but maybe you’re not religiously affiliated, or maybe you just noticed their chuppah… isn’t the prettiest. For our wedding, we wanted a chuppah that reflected our personal taste, but it also felt meaningful to get married under something we built together. The chuppah is, after all, a sketch of the home you build together as a couple, so as two people who fell in love making things together, it made emotional sense that our chuppah would be something of our own creation.
How does a chuppah work?
In the Jewish tradition, both of the groom's parents walk him down the aisle to the chuppah, the altar beneath which the couple exchanges vows. Then the bride and her parents follow. Traditionally, both sets of parents stand under the chuppah during the ceremony, alongside the bride, groom, and rabbi.
How much do chuppah cost?
Most couples see a cost of about $1,200 to $2,500 for this. You may prefer to purchase an elegant wedding chuppah cover that you can use with simple poles. The price for a nice quality silk chuppah cover costs about $350 a to $1,500 for a custom chuppah cover or one that's been hand painted, beaded or embroidered.
What chuppah means?
a canopy under which the bride and groom stand during a Jewish wedding ceremony
Chuppah, What does it mean?
A chuppah (Hebrew: חוּפָּה‎, pl. חוּפּוֹת, chuppot, literally, "canopy" or "covering"), also huppah, chipe, chupah, or chuppa, is a canopy under which a Jewish couple stand during their wedding ceremony. It consists of a cloth or sheet, sometimes a tallit, stretched or supported over four poles, or sometimes manually held up by attendants to the ceremony. A chuppah symbolizes the home that the couple will build together.
In a more general sense, chuppah refers to the method by which nesuin, the second stage of a Jewish marriage, is accomplished. According to some opinions, it is accomplished by the couple standing under the canopy along with the rabbi who weds them; however, there are other views.[
What does chuppah symbolize?
The chuppah represents a Jewish home symbolized by the cloth canopy and the four poles. Just as a chuppah is open on all four sides, so was the tent of Abraham open for hospitality. Thus, the chuppah represents hospitality to one's guests.
What constitutes chuppah?
A chuppah (Hebrew: חוּפָּה‎, pl. חוּפּוֹת, chuppot, literally, "canopy" or "covering"), also huppah, chipe, chupah, or chuppa, is a canopy under which a Jewish couple stand during their wedding ceremony.
What size chuppah?
At minimum, the chuppah needs to be big enough for the couple and officiant(s) to stand underneath it. Four by five feet is small, but comfortable for three to four people. If you want to have a few more people stand under the chuppah with you, dimensions from 6′ x 6′ to 8′ x 8′ will give you ample room.
What is chuppah fabric?
The marriage ceremony is conducted under a marriage canopy, known in Hebrew as a chuppah (literally, “covering”). It consists of a square cloth, usually made of silk or velvet, supported by four staves, and ordinarily held by four men. The chuppah is a tapestry attached to the tops of four poles.
Where is chuppah in the bible?
A chuppah (Hebrew: חוּפָּה‎, pl. חוּפּוֹת, chuppot, literally, "canopy" or "covering"), also huppah, chipe, chupah, or chuppa, is a canopy under which a Jewish couple stand during their wedding ceremony. It consists of a cloth or sheet, sometimes a tallit, stretched or supported over four poles, or sometimes manually held up by attendants to the ceremony. A chuppah symbolizes the home that the couple will build together.
Where to buy chuppah?
One of the most fun developments of Jewish wedding planning over the past few years has been the emergence of DIY kits that enable couples to build their own chuppah frames. While the first kits on offer were almost entirely made from birch branches, you can now find chuppah kits using a variety of materials.
Where to buy chuppah canopy?
As you shop for your chuppah frame, be sure to read each product listing fully so you get all the details, and if you have any questions be sure to contact the shop owner.
Where did the chuppah come from?
In Yemen, the Jewish practice was not for the groom and his bride to stand under a canopy (chuppah) hung on four poles, as is widely practised today in Jewish weddings, but rather to be secluded in a bridal chamber that was, in effect, a highly decorated room in the house of the groom, known as the chuppah (see Yichud) ...
Who holds the chuppah?
In Yemen, the Jewish practice was not for the groom and his bride to stand under a canopy (chuppah) hung on four poles, as is widely practiced today in Jewish weddings, but rather to be secluded in a bridal chamber that was, in effect, a highly decorated room in the house of the groom, known as the chuppah
Who stands under chuppah?
In Jewish services, both sets of parents stand under the chuppah during the ceremony, alongside the bride, groom, and rabbi.
Why is the chuppah important?
Symbolism. The chuppah represents a Jewish home symbolized by the cloth canopy and the four poles. Just as a chuppah is open on all four sides, so was the tent of Abraham open for hospitality. Thus, the chuppah represents hospitality to one's guests.
What is the significance of a chuppah?
Symbolism. The chuppah represents a Jewish home symbolized by the cloth canopy and the four poles. Just as a chuppah is open on all four sides, so was the tent of Abraham open for hospitality. Thus, the chuppah represents hospitality to one's guests.
What does the chuppah represent?
The chuppah represents a Jewish home symbolized by the cloth canopy and the four poles. Just as a chuppah is open on all four sides, so was the tent of Abraham open for hospitality. Thus, the chuppah represents hospitality to one's guests.
What does the chuppah symbolize?
The chuppah represents a Jewish home symbolized by the cloth canopy and the four poles. Just as a chuppah is open on all four sides, so was the tent of Abraham open for hospitality. Thus, the chuppah represents hospitality to one's guests.

Hanukkah - Chanukah

Jerusalem and Jewish Paintings

Are hanukkah candles edible?
Stick a candle in 9 of them before you eat them. (Since they are fried, sufganiyot, as they are called in Hebrew, have become a traditional food for Chanukah.)  You can eat them after, but I like cupcakes and marshmallows better.
Are hanukkah gifts wrapped?
Don't use Christmas wrapping paper: Just like you wouldn't wrap a birthday gift in Christmas paper, you shouldn't use Christmas wrapping paper for a Hanukkah gift. Look for special Hanukkah gift wrap decorated with menorahs, the Star of David, or some simple white and blue wrap.
Are hanukkah cards a thing?
Well, if you are a Christian and your friend is Jewish, then follow your Golden Rule and send them a HANUKKAH card by all means. Because your Jewish friend does not celebrate Christmas, has no particular desire to celebrate Christmas, and it is not a holiday for your Jewish friend.
Are hanukkah and christmas the same thing?
Hanukkah is often thought of as the Jewish Christmas because of its close proximity to the Christmas season, but it's not the same. Jews and Christians celebrate both Hanukkah and Christmas with lights, family, presents, and food, but the two holidays are not the same.
What are hanukkah colors?
Hanukkah Colors: Blue and White
The obvious explanation for the association of blue and white with Hanukkah is that these are the colors on the Israeli flag.
Why are hanukkah colors blue and white?
The most obvious explanation for blue and white being the colors associated with Hanukkah is the Israeli flag, designed by the Zionist movement in 1891 and officially adopted in 1948. White suggests purity, peace, and light. Blue is associated with the sky, faith, wisdom, and truth.
What are hanukkah traditions?
Celebrate the festival of lights and stick to Hanukkah traditions to show your appreciation for the holiday. Take part in Chanukah traditions such as lighting the menorah, playing the dreidel game, eating gelt, cooking and baking delicious food, and enjoying the fun of Hanukkah gifts.
How are hanukkah candles lit?
The candles are lighted in the opposite direction from how they are placed in the Chanukkiah. They are lighted from left to right, so that the newest candle is always lighted first. The helper candle, or Shamash, is lighted first, and that candle is used to light all the other candles.
Can hanukkah be in january?
“Chanukah is really early/late this year!” (Take your pick.) While the holiday usually occurs sometime during December, it does infrequently begin in late November. But what’s the latest that Chanukah can occur? Before I answer that question, let me point out that Chanukah 6791 will begin on December 13, 3030 (no typo), and Chanukah 6792 will begin on (drum roll...) January 1, 3032. That’s right; there will be no Chanukah in the civil year 3031! Now to the question: What's the latest civil date on which 25 Kislev falls? For the next 2,611 years, at least, the latest date is January 6. Chanukah begins on January 6 for the first time in 4286. And beginning in 3450, starting dates in January occur more regularly: once every fifty years or so. Useless information, but who cares?
Can hanukkah be in november?
Because the Hebrew calendar is based on the lunar cycle, the dates of Jewish holidays according to the Gregorian calendar change from year to year. For this reason, the beginning of Hanukkah can range from late November to late December.
When can hanukkah occur?
Hanukkah (/ˈhɑːnəkə/; Hebrew: חֲנֻכָּה‎ ḥanukká, Tiberian: ḥanukkā, usually spelled חֲנוּכָּה‎, pronounced [χanuˈka] in Modern Hebrew, [ˈχanukə] or [ˈχanikə] in Yiddish; a transliteration also romanized as Chanukah, Ḥanukah, Chanuka, Hanuka) is a Jewish festival commemorating the recovery of Jerusalem and subsequent rededication of the Second Temple at the beginning of the Maccabean revolt against the Seleucid Empire in the 2nd century BCE.[2][3] It is also known as the Festival of Lights (Hebrew: חַג הַאוּרִים‎, ḥag ha'urim).
Can you celebrate hanukkah and christmas?
Jews and Christians celebrate both Hanukkah and Christmas with lights, family, presents, and food, but the two holidays are not the same. Hanukkah and Christmas are both celebrated in December, but thanks to the Jewish calendar, sometimes Hanukkah is celebrated in November.
Can gentiles celebrate hanukkah?
Non-Jews are certainly welcome to celebrate Hannukah with Jews. However, it is problematic if non-Jews celebrate and adopt Hannukah by themselves, and it is especially problematic if this adoption entails imparting Hannukah with new meaning, especially new meaning that is connected with Christian beliefs or other non-Jewish beliefs. Keep in mind that Hannukah not only celebrates our survival through a near miraculous military victory over the far larger Greek Seleucid Empire as well as the rededication of the Temple subsequent to the victory, but it also celebrates successful rejecting of forced assimilation; an important part of the Hannukah story and why it was so important that the Maccabees defeat the Seleucid Empire was for their attempt to deny Jews the right to practice Judaism as well as their attempt to forcibly assimilate Jews. In adopting Hannukah, one is — in effect — being assimilationist and culturally erasing in ways that can be perceived as subverting the underlying ideas of the holiday. It's certainly possible to celebrate with each other, but please do not cross over the line into ownership.
Can you eat hanukkah candles?
Stick a candle in 9 of them before you eat them. (Since they are fried, sufganiyot, as they are called in Hebrew, have become a traditional food for Chanukah.) You can eat them after, but I like cupcakes and marshmallows better
Can you spell hanukkah with a c?
For many English speakers, the festival is also known for confusion over the spelling of its name: Is it Hanukkah or Chanukah? The answer is that both are considered correct, though Hanukkah is the most widely used spelling, while Chanukah is more traditional. In addition, more than 20 other variations are recorded.
How early can hanukkah be?
Hanukkah is observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar, which may occur at any time from late November to late December in the Gregorian calendar.
How hanukkah is celebrated?
Many modern Jewish families celebrate by lighting the hanukkiah. One candle per night of Hanukkah is lit, like Hebrew is read, from right to left. People might also play dreidel games and eat certain foods like sufganiyot (similar to jelly donuts) and latkes (fried potato pancakes).
How hanukkah started?
According to I Maccabees, the celebration of Hanukkah was instituted by Judas Maccabeus in 165 bce to celebrate his victory over Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the Seleucid king who had invaded Judaea, tried to Hellenize the Jews, and desecrated the Second Temple in Jerusalem.
How hanukkah is celebrated in different countries?
Many countries celebrate by lighting a menorah, but a few have special menorahs with symbolic meaning. Hanukkah is so much more than just a good-natured excuse for Jews to give gifts around Christmas — but there is something to that idea. Traditionally, Hanukkah isn't meant to be a significant or large holiday.
How hanukkah is celebrated today?
During Hanukkah, on each of the eight nights, a candle is lit in a special menorah (candelabra) called a 'hanukkiyah'. Most Jewish families and households have a special menorah and celebrate Hanukkah. Hanukkah is also a time for giving and receiving presents and gifts are often given on each night.
How hanukkah works?
The Hanukkah celebration revolves around the kindling of a nine-branched menorah, known in Hebrew as the hanukiah. On each of the holiday's eight nights, another candle is added to the menorah after sundown; the ninth candle, called the shamash (“helper”), is used to light the others.
How hanukkah date is determined?
Hanukkah is observed for eight nights and days every year. Normally it occurs between late November and December, although the exact dates change every year. This is because Hanukkah is always on the 25th day of Kislev in the Hebrew calendar. 25 Kislev is a date from the Hebrew calendar.
How hanukkah candles are lit?
On the first night of Hanukkah, place a candle in the holder on the far right, and light it with the shamash. Then put the shamash back in its spot (leaving it lit). On the second night, light the candle second from the right, then the candle on the far right, and replace the lit shamash.
How hanukkah is celebrated now?
To mark the holiday, Jews light one candle each evening on a nine-branched menorah. The ninth candle – the shamash, ("helper" or "attendant") – is used to light the other eight. Playing with tops called dreidels and exchanging gifts are other Hanukkah traditions to celebrate the holiday.
What hanukkah means?
Hanukkah, which means “dedication” in Hebrew, begins on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar and usually falls in November or December. Often called the Festival of Lights, the holiday is celebrated with the lighting of the menorah, traditional foods, games and gifts
What hanukkah celebrates?
The eight-day Jewish celebration known as Hanukkah or Chanukah commemorates the rededication during the second century B.C. of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, where according to legend Jews had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors in the Maccabean Revolt.
What hanukkah day is it today?
In 2020, Hanukkah begins at sundown on Thursday, December 10, and continues through Friday, December 18.
What's hanukkah day?
The eight-day Jewish celebration known as Hanukkah or Chanukah commemorates the rededication during the second century B.C. of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, where according to legend Jews had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors in the Maccabean Revolt. Hanukkah, which means “dedication” in Hebrew, begins on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar and usually falls in November or December. Often called the Festival of Lights, the holiday is celebrated with the lighting of the menorah, traditional foods, games and gifts.
What hanukkah gifts are given?
Ideas include gold gelt coins (traditional chocolate coins in gold foil), a dreidel and handwritten blessings to say as the Hanukkah candles are lit. Top your gift jar with festive blue and silver ribbon.
What hanukkah means to me?
Hanukkah, which means “dedication” in Hebrew, begins on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar and usually falls in November or December. Often called the Festival of Lights, the holiday is celebrated with the lighting of the menorah, traditional foods, games and gifts.
What hanukkah candle is lit first?
The helper candle, or shamash, is lighted first, and that candle is used to light all the other candles.
What hanukkah does?
Hanukkah, (Hebrew: “Dedication”) also spelled Ḥanukka, Chanukah, or Chanukkah, also called Feast of Dedication, Festival of Lights, or Feast of the Maccabees, Jewish festival that begins on Kislev 25 (in December, according to the Gregorian calendar) and is celebrated for eight days.
When hanukkah start?
Hanukkah (/ˈhɑːnəkə/; Hebrew: חֲנֻכָּה‎ ḥanukká, Tiberian: ḥanukkā, usually spelled חֲנוּכָּה‎, pronounced [χanuˈka] in Modern Hebrew, [ˈχanukə] or [ˈχanikə] in Yiddish; a transliteration also romanized as Chanukah, Ḥanukah, Chanuka, Hanuka) is a Jewish festival commemorating the recovery of Jerusalem and subsequent rededication of the Second Temple at the beginning of the Maccabean revolt against the Seleucid Empire in the 2nd century BCE.[2][3] It is also known as the Festival of Lights (Hebrew: חַג הַאוּרִים‎, ḥag ha'urim).
Hanukkah is observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar, which may occur at any time from late November to late December in the Gregorian calendar. The festival is observed by lighting the candles of a candelabrum with nine branches, called a menorah (or hanukkiah). One branch is typically placed above or below the others and its candle is used to light the other eight candles. This unique candle is called the shamash (Hebrew: שַׁמָּשׁ‎, "attendant"). Each night, one additional candle is lit by the shamash until all eight candles are lit together on the final night of the festival.[4] Other Hanukkah festivities include singing Hanukkah songs, playing the game of dreidel and eating oil-based foods, such as latkes and sufganiyot, and dairy foods. Since the 1970s, the worldwide Chabad Hasidic movement has initiated public menorah lightings in open public places in many countries.
When hanukkah ends?
Many Jewish people in the United States mark the last day of Hanukkah as the end of the Hanukkah celebrations. Hanukkah, also known as the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day Jewish observance to commemorate the Jewish people's struggle for religious freedom.
When hanukkah 2020?
Hanukkah begins on Thursday, December 10, at sundown. Learn about Hanukkah history, customs, and a few traditional recipes! WHAT IS HANUKKAH? Hanukkah (also spelled “Chanukah”) is an eight-day winter “festival of lights,” which begins each year on the 25th day of the Jewish month of Kislev.
When hanukkah celebrated?
The eight-day Jewish celebration known as Hanukkah or Chanukah commemorates the rededication during the second century B.C. of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, where according to legend Jews had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors in the Maccabean Revolt.
When hanukkah starts 2019?
2022:   December 18-26
2023:   December 7-15
2024:   December 25-January 2
2025:   December 14-22
When hanukkah falls on shabbat?
Chanukah coincides – literally and symbolically – with three particular mitzvot. The Syrian-Greeks, in their attempts to assimilate the Jews banned three mitzvot: brit milah (circumcision), Rosh Chodesh (the sanctification of a new month) and Shabbat – the Sabbath. To symbolize our continuing adherence to God’s mitzvot despite such decrees, Chanukah is eight days long (a brit milah being performed on a baby boy’s eighth day), Chanukah always includes Rosh Chodesh (the month of Tevet always starting during the course of the holiday), and Chanukah includes at least one Shabbat, sometimes two. In this article we will examine the issues that come into play around the Shabbat (or Shabbatot) of Chanukah.
Where hanukkah is celebrated?
Perhaps the most traditional and obvious place to celebrate Hanukkah is the Jewish homeland of Jerusalem. Hanukkah began in Israel, and many travel here for the holiday to see where it all began.
Where is hanukkah in the bible?
Did you know? The story of Hanukkah does not appear in the Torah because the events that inspired the holiday occurred after it was written. It is, however, mentioned in the New Testament, in which Jesus attends a "Feast of Dedication."
Where is hanukkah celebrated around the world?
Perhaps the most traditional and obvious place to celebrate Hanukkah is the Jewish homeland of Jerusalem. Hanukkah began in Israel, and many travel here for the holiday to see where it all began.
Where did hanukkah start?
Hanukkah began in Israel over 2,000 years ago. According to Jewish tradition, Israel was ruled during the second century B.C. by a Syrian-Greek people called the Seleucids. The Seleucids practiced a form of Zoroastrianism, and they wanted the Jews to adopt their religion and culture.
Where is hanukkah mostly celebrated?
Perhaps the most traditional and obvious place to celebrate Hanukkah is the Jewish homeland of Jerusalem. Hanukkah began in Israel, and many travel here for the holiday to see where it all began.
Where is hanukkah celebrated map?
The Hanukkah story began with a confrontation in Modi’in in roughly 168 BCE and ended several years later, when the Maccabees — the band of Jewish fighters who battled the Syrian empire — regained control of the Second Temple in Jerusalem and rededicated it. The seven major battles of the Maccabean Revolt took place in what is now the West Bank, also known as Judea and Samaria.
Where does hanukkah get celebrated?
Hanukkah is the Jewish Festival of Lights and it remembers the rededication of the second Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, in Israel.
Where is hanukkah celebrated today?
To Jewish people, however, Hanukkah isn't actually all that religious of a holiday –though because of its proximity to Christmas, it's often assumed the most important Jewish holiday. It's not. Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Passover, for example, are more religiously observed, though Hanukkah certainly holds cultural significance.
which hanukkah candle is lit first?
The candles are lighted in the opposite direction from how they are placed in the chanukiah. They are lighted from left to right, so that the newest candle is always lighted first. The helper candle, or shamash, is lighted first, and that candle is used to light all the other candles.
which hanukkah candles to light?
The candles are lighted in the opposite direction from how they are placed in the chanukiah. They are lighted from left to right, so that the newest candle is always lighted first. The helper candle, or shamash, is lighted first, and that candle is used to light all the other candles.
Which hanukkah day is it?
The first day of Hanukkah marks the start of Hanukkah, also known as Chanukah or Festival of Lights. Hanukkah is an eight-day Jewish observance that remembers the Jewish people's struggle for religious freedom.
Hanukkah which religion?
Hanukkah is a Jewish festival that reaffirms the ideals of Judaism and commemorates in particular the rededication of the Second Temple of Jerusalem by the lighting of candles on each day of the festival.
Hanukkah which way to light the candles?
The candles are lighted in the opposite direction from how they are placed in the chanukiah. They are lighted from left to right, so that the newest candle is always lighted first. The helper candle, or shamash, is lighted first, and that candle is used to light all the other candles.
Hanukkah which candle?
Yes, there actually is a correct order. The candles should be placed from right to left. On the first night, there should be one candle on the far right of the chanukiah, plus the shamash. On the second night, there should be two candles on the right, plus the shamash, and so on.
Hanukkah which date?
Many Jewish communities in the United States observe the first day of Hanukkah, which marks the start of Hanukkah, also known as Chanukah or Festival of Lights. Hanukkah is an eight-day Jewish observance that remembers the Jewish people's struggle for religious freedom.
Hanukkah who celebrates it?
The eight-day Jewish celebration known as Hanukkah or Chanukah commemorates the rededication during the second century B.C. of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, where according to legend Jews had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors in the Maccabean Revolt.
Who started hanukkah?
According to I Maccabees, the celebration of Hanukkah was instituted by Judas Maccabeus in 165 bce to celebrate his victory over Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the Seleucid king who had invaded Judaea, tried to Hellenize the Jews, and desecrated the Second Temple in Jerusalem.
Who made hanukkah?
According to I Maccabees, the celebration of Hanukkah was instituted by Judas Maccabeus in 165 bce to celebrate his victory over Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the Seleucid king who had invaded Judaea, tried to Hellenize the Jews, and desecrated the Second Temple in Jerusalem.
Who is hanukkah harry?
Some Americans might be quick to say that Hanukkah Harry is the patron figure of Hanukkah, comparable to Santa Claus’s role for Christmas. However, Hanukkah Harry’s origins can be traced only as far back as 1989, when the fictional character first appeared in a Saturday Night Live (SNL) sketch, played by Jewish actor Jon Lovitz. Titled “The Night Hanukkah Harry Saved Christmas,” it tells the story of Santa Claus (played by Phil Hartman), who has fallen ill, calling on his friend Hanukkah Harry to be his substitute on Christmas Eve. Both Santa and Harry want to ensure all the good “gentile” girls and boys still receive their presents.
Who celebrates hanukkah What country?
Hanukkah is so much more than just a good-natured excuse for Jews to give gifts around Christmas — but there is something to that idea. Traditionally, Hanukkah isn’t meant to be a significant or large holiday. In fact, many overlooked holidays such as Sukkot, the celebration of the harvest, and Rosh Chodesh, the celebration of every new month, are far more meaningful in terms of tradition and religious value.
Who brings hanukkah presents?
The Real Reason American Jews Give Gifts During Hanukkah. For Jewish people around the world, Hanukkah is marked by lighting candles on the menorah for eight nights, eating latkes and spinning the dreidel. But when the holiday starts — on the evening of Dec.
Why hanukkah is celebrated?
The eight-day Jewish celebration known as Hanukkah or Chanukah commemorates the rededication during the second century B.C. of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, where according to legend Jews had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors in the Maccabean Revolt.
Why hanukkah is important?
The eight-day Jewish celebration known as Hanukkah or Chanukah commemorates the rededication during the second century B.C. of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, where according to legend Jews had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors in the Maccabean Revolt.
Why hanukkah is celebrated for 8 days?
Hanukkah means “dedication” in Hebrew. The eight-day holiday celebrates the rededication of the Temple of Jerusalem after it was retaken by the Maccabees, a group of Jewish warriors, from the Greeks in the 2nd century BCE, as explained by Tablet magazine.
Why hanukkah is better than christmas?
Chanukah (or Hanukkah), the Jewish festival of light, runs this year from the evening of December 12 until the evening of December 20 and celebrates the miracle of the oil that burned for eight days after the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem over 2500 years ago. And whilst Chanukah may not have Santa, reindeer or mince pies, for eight good reasons Chanukah is actually better than Christmas! Here’s why.
Why hanukkah gelt?
Hanukkah History: Those Chocolate Coins Were Once Real Tips : The Salt Many Jewish families celebrate the holiday by handing out gelt, chocolate coins covered in gold and silver. These days they're treats for kids. But the practice began as a way to thank labor.
Why hanukkah is biblical?
The eight-day Jewish celebration known as Hanukkah or Chanukah commemorates the rededication during the second century B.C. of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, where according to legend Jews had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors in the Maccabean Revolt.
Why hanukkah gifts?
Parents didn't want their children to feel left out as their peers received presents every December. “[Parents] saw that [giving gifts] was a way of creating joy around the time of Hanukkah,” Creditor says. “I think it wasn't to be like Christmas, it was so that Jewish children would have joy on Hanukkah.
Hanukkah Why 9 candles?
The centerpiece of the Hanukkah celebration is the hanukkiah or menorah, a candelabra that holds nine candles. Eight candles symbolize the number of days that the Temple lantern blazed; the ninth, the shamash, is a helper candle used to light the others.
Will hanukkah ever be in january?
Hanukkah starts on the Hebrew calendar date of 25 Kislev. On that evening, the first candle on the menorah is lit at nightfall. Hanukkah lasts for 8 days.
Will hanukkah consume you?
When the world-swallowing Candle Scream of Hanukkah comes blasting out of the woods, what course of action will you take to protect your brain? Will you remember who you are when Hanukkah comes ripping through the world, or will your mind get ruined in the furious candle-tantrum? Take this quiz to find out!
When will hanukkah and thanksgiving coincide again?
That slippage means that 200 years from now, Hanukkah won't ever begin earlier than November 29. Because November 28 is the latest day that Thanksgiving can fall, the two holidays won't overlap again until the year 79,811.
When will hanukkah fall on thanksgiving again?
This month, Hanukkah and Thanksgiving will overlap for a joint celebration that will never happen again. Here’s why. (Try to keep up with me on this.)
Thanksgiving is the 4th Thursday in November. Hanukkah is the 25th day of the Jewish month of Kislev.
The 4th Thursday in November can range from the 22nd to the 28th. If the 29th is a Thursday, then so is the 1st, so the 29th would be the fifth Thursday, not the fourth. And if the 21st is a Thursday, then it’s only the third Thursday. On average, then, Thanksgiving falls on the 28th about every seven years. It will fall on the 28th this year, then again in 2019, 2024, 2030, and 2041, or four times in the next 28 years. (It’s not exactly every seven years because leap days throw things off a little.)
When will hanukkah fall on Christmas?
This year, Hanukkah will start on the evening of Thursday, December 10, 2020. It will end on the evening of Friday, December 18, 2020. Each year, Hanukkah begins on the 25th day of Kislev, which is the ninth month of the Jewish calendar.

 

Hebron

maarat hamachpela

What to do in Hebron?
Top Attractions in Hebron. Cave of the Patriarchs. 113. Masjid-e-Khalil Mosque. Religious Sites. Susya - National Heritage Site. Historic Sites • Ancient Ruins. Mosque of Prophet Yunus. Points of Interest & Landmarks • Religious Sites. Pal Events. Civic Centres. Hebron Hope Center. Hebron Glass & Ceramics.
What is Hebron in the bible?
Hebron is one of the oldest cities in the region. Because of its associations with the biblical patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and with King David, it is one of the four holy cities of Judaism (Jerusalem, Hebron, Tiberias, and Ẕefat [Safed])
What does Hebron mean in hebrew?
For a meaning of the name Hebron, Jones' Dictionary of Old Testament Proper Names proposes Confederation. The name Hebron likely derives from the Hebrew root ח.ב.ר, meaning “friend.” The name is known from ancient stamp seals (see discussion further on) as well as from the Bible.
What does Hebron mean in the bible?
A city in the south end of the valley of Eshcol, about midway between Jerusalem and Beersheba, from which it is distant about 20 miles in a straight line. It was built "seven years before Zoan in Egypt" ( Genesis 13:18 ; Numbers 13:22 ). It still exists under the same name, and is one of the most ancient cities in the world. Its earlier name was Kirjath-arba ( Genesis 23:2 ; Joshua 14:15 ; 15:3 ). But "Hebron would appear to have been the original name of the city, and it was not till after Abraham's stay there that it received the name Kirjath-arba, who [i.e., Arba] was not the founder but the conqueror of the city, having led thither the tribe of the Anakim, to which he belonged. It retained this name till it came into the possession of Caleb, when the Israelites restored the original name Hebron" (Keil, Com.). The name of this city does not occur in any of the prophets or in the New Testament.

Jerusalem

Jerusalem and Jewish paintings

What Jerusalem means?
Jerusalem. A holy city for Jews (see also Jews), Christians (see also Christian), and Muslims; the capital of the ancient kingdom of Judah and of the modern state of Israel. The name means “city of peace.” Jerusalem is often called Zion; Mount Zion is the hill on which the fortress of the city was built.
What Jerusalem artichoke?
The Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus), also called sunroot, sunchoke, or earth apple, is a species of sunflower native to central North America. It is cultivated widely across the temperate zone for its tuber, which is used as a root vegetable.
What Jerusalem means in hebrew?
Jerusalem. A holy city for Jews (see also Jews), Christians (see also Christian), and Muslims; the capital of the ancient kingdom of Judah and of the modern state of Israel. The name means “city of peace.” Jerusalem is often called Zion; Mount Zion is the hill on which the fortress of the city was built.
What Jerusalem looked like?
Exactly 180 years ago, in the summer of 1839, Jerusalem became the first site in the Land of Israel to be documented with a camera. It was only a few months after practical photography was invented in Paris. In the coming years, there was a steady increase in the number of photographers who came to Jerusalem from Europe with various types of cameras. Biblical landscapes, the cradle of Jesus’ birth and especially the city itself assumed a real and concrete shape for the first time.
What Jerusalem is like today?
In December 1917 — 100 years ago this month — the British general Edmund Allenby seized control of Jerusalem from its Ottoman Turkish defenders. Dismounting his horse, he entered the Old City on foot, through Jaffa Gate, out of respect for its holy status.
In the century since, Jerusalem has been fought over in varying ways, not only by Jews, Christians and Muslims but also by external powers and, of course, modern-day Israelis and Palestinians.
What's Jerusalem worth?
Towards the end of the movie Kingdom of Heaven, after Balin surrenders control of Jerusalem to Saladin, he asks the question, "What is Jerusalem worth?" Is there any deeper meaning to the reply? As per the IMDB quotes page: Balian of Ibelin: What is Jerusalem worth? Saladin: Everything!
What's Jerusalem worth nothing everything?
Nothing and everything. Nothing refers to the pure materialistic value of property, gold, silver jewleries, food, water, land etc. This does not make Jerusalem special; other places are equally bestowed with such goods, hence it is worth nothing more than any other city on earth.
When Jerusalem became capital of Israel?
With the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, Jerusalem became once more the capital of a sovereign Jewish state. Throughout the millennia of its existence, Jerusalem has never been the capital of any other sovereign nation.
When Jerusalem fell?
On the 9th of the month of Av (August 29) in ad 70, Jerusalem fell; the Temple was burned, and the Jewish state collapsed, although the fortress of Masada was not conquered by the Roman general Flavius Silva until April 73.
When Jerusalem was destroyed?
Following the siege of 597 BC, the Neo-Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar installed Zedekiah as vassal king of Judah, at the age of 21. However, Zedekiah revolted against Babylon, and entered into an alliance with Pharaoh Hophra, the king of Egypt. Nebuchadnezzar responded by invading Judah (2 Kings 25:1).
When Jerusalem temple was destroyed?
The Second Temple (בֵּית־הַמִּקְדָּשׁ הַשֵּׁנִי, Beit HaMikdash HaSheni) was the Jewish holy temple, which stood on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, between c. 516 BCE and c. 70 CE. It gave name to the Second Temple period.
According to the Hebrew Bible, it replaced Solomon's Temple (the First Temple),[1] which was destroyed by the Neo-Babylonian Empire in 586 BCE, when Jerusalem was conquered and part of the population of the Kingdom of Judah was taken into exile to Babylon.
According to the Bible, the Second Temple was originally a rather modest structure constructed by a number of Jewish exile groups returning to the Levant from Babylon under the Achaemenid-appointed governor Zerubbabel. However, during the reign of Herod the Great, the Second Temple was completely refurbished, and the original structure was totally overhauled into the large and magnificent edifices and facades that are more recognizable. Much as the Babylonians destroyed the First Temple, the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and Jerusalem in c. 70 CE as retaliation for an ongoing Jewish revolt. The Second Temple lasted for a total of 585 years (516 BCE to c. 70 CE).[2][3]
Jewish eschatology includes a belief that the Second Temple will be replaced by a future Third Temple.
When Jerusalem fell to the ottoman?
During its long history, Jerusalem has been attacked 52 times, captured and recaptured 44 times, besieged 23 times, and destroyed twice.[1] The oldest part of the city was settled in the 4th millennium BCE, making Jerusalem one of the oldest cities in the world.[2]
Given the city's central position in both Israeli nationalism and Palestinian nationalism, the selectivity required to summarize more than 6,000 years of inhabited history is often[3][4] influenced by ideological bias or background (see Historiography and nationalism). For example, the Jewish periods of the city's history are important to Israeli nationalists, whose discourse states that modern Jews originate and descend from the Israelites,[Note 1][Note 2] while the Islamic periods of the city's history are important to Palestinian nationalists, whose discourse suggests that modern Palestinians descend from all the different peoples who have lived in the region.[Note 3][Note 4] As a result, both sides claim the history of the city has been politicized by the other in order to strengthen their relative claims to the city,[3][4][9][10] and that this is borne out by the different focuses the different writers place on the various events and eras in the city's history.
When Jerusalem was built?
Scholars believe the first human settlements in Jerusalem took place during the Early Bronze Age—somewhere around 3500 B.C.
In 1000 B.C., King David conquered Jerusalem and made it the capital of the Jewish kingdom. His son, Solomon, built the first holy Temple about 40 years later.
Where Jerusalem is located?
Jerusalem, Hebrew Yerushalayim, Arabic Bayt al-Muqaddas or Al-Quds, ancient city of the Middle East that since 1967 has been wholly under the rule of the State of Israel.
Where Jerusalem is located on a map?
Map is showing Jerusalem, seat of the Israeli government and largest city of Israel. The holy city of the Jews is sacred to Christians and Muslims as well. The city is located in the Judaean hills about 32 km (20 mi) from the Jordan River and about 30 km west of the northern tip of the Dead Sea.
Where in Jerusalem Jesus was born?
Bethlehem lies 10 kilometers south of the city of Jerusalem, in the fertile limestone hill country of the Holy Land. Since at least the 2nd century AD people have believed that the place where the Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem, now stands is where Jesus was born.
Where in Jerusalem Jesus was buried?
The tomb is located in one of the world's holiest sites for Christians, the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem's Old City.
Where in Jerusalem Christ was crucified?
According to the New Testament, Jesus was crucified at a spot outside Jerusalem called Golgotha, which in Aramaic means “place of the skull.” The Latin word for skull is calvaria, and in English many Christians refer to the site of the crucifixion as Calvary.

Kotel

kotel view
Kotel what language?
The Little Western Wall, also known as HaKotel HaKatan (or just Kotel Katan), the Small Kotel, (Hebrew: הכותל הקטן‎), and the Kleiner Koisel (Yiddish for "The Smaller Kotel/Wall") is a Jewish religious site located in the Muslim Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem near the Iron Gate to the Temple Mount.[1] The wall itself dates from the Second Temple period, (516 BCE – 70 CE). It is the continuation of the larger part of the Western Wall and almost exactly faces the Holy of Holies.[2] HaKotel HaKatan is not as well-known and not as crowded as the larger part of the Western Wall.[3] This section of the wall is of deep spiritual significance because of its close proximity to the Holy of Holies. However, it is not the closest location to the Holy of Holies, as there is a location in the Western Wall Tunnel which directly faces the Holy of Holies.
What does Kotel mean?
There are many misconceptions about the Temple Mount, the Kotel and the Al Aqsa mosque. Confusion and even much conflict can be dispelled when the facts are made clear! The misconception and outright lies about the history of this site must be negated. Recent efforts to deny history require that we relearn the facts and remain committed to the centrality of Jerusalem in Jewish identity.
What is Kotel in Israel?
Western Wall, Hebrew Ha-Kotel Ha-Maʿaravi, also called Wailing Wall, in the Old City of Jerusalem, a place of prayer and pilgrimage sacred to the Jewish people. It is the only remains of the retaining wall surrounding the Temple Mount, the site of the First and Second Temples of Jerusalem, held to be uniquely holy by the ancient Jews. The First Temple was destroyed by the Babylonians in 587–586 BCE, and the Second Temple was destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE.
What does Kotel mean in hebrew?
The Wailing Wall (as it is known in the West) or Western Wall (derived from Hebrew: הַכּוֹתֶל הַמַּעֲרָבִי‎, romanized: HaKotel HaMa'aravi, lit. 'the western wall',[1] often shortened to the Kotel or Kosel), known in Islam as the Buraq Wall (Arabic: Ḥā'iṭ al-Burāq حَائِط ٱلْبُرَاق Arabic pronunciation: ['ħaːʔɪtˤ albʊ'raːq]),[2] is an ancient limestone wall in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is a relatively small segment of a far longer ancient retaining wall, known also in its entirety as the "Western Wall".[3] The wall was originally erected as part of the expansion of the Second Jewish Temple begun by Herod the Great,[4] which resulted in the encasement of the natural, steep hill known to Jews and Christians as the Temple Mount, in a huge rectangular structure topped by a flat platform, thus creating more space for the Temple itself, its auxiliary buildings, and crowds of worshipers and visitors.
What does ha Kotel mean?
Western Wall. A remnant of the retaining wall that underlay the second Temple in Jerusalem. The Western Wall is now a site of pilgrimage, lamentation, and prayer by Jews. Also called Wailing Wall.
When was the Kotel built?
The Wailing Wall or Western Wall, known in Islam as the Buraq Wall, is an ancient limestone wall in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is a relatively small segment of a far longer ancient retaining wall, known also in its entirety as the "Western Wall".
Where is the Kotel located?
The Wailing Wall or Western Wall, known in Islam as the Buraq Wall, is an ancient limestone wall in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is a relatively small segment of a far longer ancient retaining wall, known also in its entirety as the "Western Wall".

 

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